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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 383 (some duplicates have been removed)
sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news." >> brennan: good evening. i'm margaret brennan. the pace of anti-american protests eased a bit today. u.s. marines arrived in yemen to bolster security at the american embassy. but another contingent was refused entry to sudan. the state department says tonight, it's ordering all non-essential personnel to leave both sudan and tunisia, these developments four days after the violent on theus consulate in libya that killed the u.s. ambassador and three members of his team. tonight we are getting our first look at the safe house that came under fire. charlie d'agata and a cbs news crew reached the building today. here's their report. >> reporter: the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi was just the beginning of a terrifying night for the americans inside. libyan officials told us their forces helped evacuate 32 americans out of the consulate as attacks are torched and stormed the compound. i libyan commander told us a convoy of 22 vehicles, two of them armored, raced from the u.s. consulate down this road to a safe house a mile and a half
in the school production of toad hall. probably her most fascinating relationship was with margaret thatcher and in the course of our reporting i gained some great insights into how that relationship worked and some of which contradicted the common view. the queen does not have executive power, but she does have unique influence. in her role as head of state she represents government officially at home and abroad but she also serves as the head of nations which means that she connects with people to reward their achievements and remain in touch with their concerns. to decades past the normal retirement age, she still does something like 400 engagements a year. traveling around the united kingdom, cities as well as tiny hamlets. charles pole who served as private secretary for john meyer and margaret thatcher told me that the queen knows every inch of this country and in a way no one else does. she spends so much time meeting people that she has an understanding of what other people's lives are like. she understands what the normal human condition is. she has also spent an extraordinary amoun
, is margaret carlson of bloomberg news. margaret, great to see you. before i get to you, i want to send a question over to our folks on set. senator bradley, someone who has in fact run for president, i want to ask you the question of michelle obama as a surrogate has never been one that i think has been unanswered in the public sphere which is to say she's always been great, right? last night, i think she took it to a new level and while she never named mitt romney or his vp, her speech was very much a point by point take-down of everything they represent. i want to know what you thought of her speech. >> i thought her speech was exceptional. i thought one of the things she did extremely well is everything she said, you could tell she felt deeply and personally. so it came across tremendously authentic and therefore, had a lot of power. and she talked not simply about the president but about the country, about their lives together, their family, where they come from, and she's talked i think brilliantly about making sure you reach back and give other people the same chances that you've
want to go to margaret brennan, who is at the state department. margaret, understandably, this is difficult authorifor those a state department and government. what is the u.s. doing right now, and how concerned are they about other americans? >> reporter: they're very concerned about u.s. installations all around the world, particularly the mideast region. secretary of state hillary clinton is expected to begin addressing some of these concerns shortly from the treaty room here at the state department. what we do know is the secretary and her top deputies worked through the evening in what was originally thought to be an extraction operation. in other words, there was the hope that some of those who had come under fire at the consulate in benghazi, libya, could have been saved. it became apparent well into the evening that was not the case. at 10:00 p.m. it was reported there was one fatality. we have learned since then that four u.s. government personnel were killed in that skirmish in benghazi, libya. the exact details are not clear just yet. we're hoping the secretary
, type in his name, and you can watch both hours from "q&a," and now the last call is from margaret in orange county, california. margaret, plead go ahead. margaret, we're listening. i think march -- margaret is gone. >> guest: i'll say two hours of robert caro is more than enough. >> host: robert has been our guest here on booktv at the national book festival. it's "the passage of power". what's the time frame this volume covers? >> guest: starts in 1958 when johnson starts to run for the presidency, and it ends on january 8th, 1964 with his first state of the union speech so about five >> host: war happens to people one by one. what's that mean? >> guest: i was struck by the quote because i was following the war home to the half of every individual fighter, which is a phrase i'm quoting from dh lawrence, and war does affect every single individual involvedded in it whether they be soldiers or civilians. it has -- it's a monster that reaches deep inside every single person, and turns every life updied down, and i thought it was an apt quote. >> host: how many women served in the ir
a softer tone today, a change from his original president. joining us, three guests, ben smith, margaret hoover and maria cardova. maria, do you want to respond to that? >> sure. frankly it's just a misguided notion. i think a majority of the american voters will see it that way. i guess they have to do something because they're so behind on the issue of foreign policy that i guess they feel they have to throw everything plus the kitchen sink to see if they can make a dent in president obama's leadership here and frankly it shows in the numbers. he's ahead by, what, 8 to 10 points on foreign policy. and i think frankly the blunder that mitt romney made earlier this week in attacking president obama on 9/11 with misguided facts i think underscores the fact that he is just not ready to be commander in chief and they're worried about that. >> margaret, i don't want to rehash too much history but was that a blunder? >> i think even mitt romney has suggested that within a certain time frame maybe he might not have said it that way but he has stuck to his word that he and the president agree t
more insight on this, joining me now is margaret hoover who is a cnn political contributor who served in the george w. bush white house. her book is called "american individualism." and also with me, democratic strategist bernard whitman. i'm going to get to both of you in just a moment. i want to play a little more of those comments made by romney at that private fund-raiser. this was surreptitiously recorded specifically about the 47% group. have a listen. >> my job is not to worry about those people. i'll never convince them they should take personal responsibility and care for their lives. >> all right, margaret hoover, i want to start with you. my job is not to be concerned about w that group. sounds reminiscent of something he said in february to soledad o'brien. i'm not concerned about poor people he said he wasn't concerned that he thought he would fix anything wrong with the social safety net, but this has got to be troublesome. how troublesome is it? he did host a very late-night news conference. >> right. well, it's troublesome in that it's an inartful tic he has, where he
general assembly. margaret warner gives us a preview. >> woodruff: will new genetic findings reshape the treatment of breast cancer? we ask dr. harold varmus, head of the national cancer institute. >> ifill: and ray suarez kicks off american graduate week with a conversation with three now- successful people who know exactly what it's like to want to drop out of high school. >> sometimes we give up on kids too soon. sometimes we want to teach to the test instead of teaching to transform. sometimes that comes from top-down policies. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: soon computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences. igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out, sponsoring tomorrow starts today. >> bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contri
, margaret chu. [applause] i also brought with me the deputies said pete produce superintendent for so solid justice, mr. garrido. this is such a special school, i brought two deputy superintendent. the other deputy is in charge of policy and operations. myung lee. he is jumping back there. does anybody here want to be a lawyer? oh, come on, parents. this is so special, we brought the general counsel, the big lawyer in the district. his name is don davis, and he is over there. and then our director of communications is a factor as well. -- back there as well. why do i introduce the people to you? because we are so proud of harvey milk civil-rights academy, we all wanted to be here on the first day of school. this is not the last time you will see us. we want to come back to read in the classrooms. i understand you do a school dance. maybe we get invited to do that. we want you to have a great school year. q want to thank all of you parents for all that you do. we cannot do this without you. let's have a great year. yay! [applause] >> thank you. we have traditions here at harvey milk. one of
, the man who is supposed to take over next month. our state department correspondent margaret brennan has been looking into this. >> reporter: the last photo of the man expected to be china's next president, 59-year-old xi jinping, was taken on september 1. for the past ten days, he has not shown up at any scheduled public events. his apparent disappearance has sparked speculation in the world press. when asked about it at a news conference, a chinese foreign ministry spokesman refused to comment. "i hope that you can ask more serious questions" he said. adding to the mystery: government sensors are blocking search results for xi's name. the intrigue began after xi canceled a meeting set for last wednesday with secretary of state hillary clinton. state department staff members who were in beijing to meet with chinese leadership were told around 11:00 the night before that the secretary's meeting with mr. xi was canceled. the chinese ministry cited unexpected scheduling reasons. his latest political twist comes at a crucial point. china's fast-growing economy is slowing down and chinese au
ifill. on the newshour tonight, we get reaction to the president's speech from margaret warner in new york. >> woodruff: and we assess the administration's foreign policy as mitt romney criticizes the president for the way he's handled overseas crises. >> ifill: then, paul solman looks at why applying for jobs online may just not work. >> woodruff: what's behind the >> i check the email and the job sites hourly. from 7:00 in the morning until midnight. >> woodruff: what's behind the drop in s.a.t. scores? ray suarez looks at the surge in the number of students taking the test, and what it tells us about learning. >> ifill: plus, we talk with journalist bob merry. his new book explores how voters, pollsters, and historians judge presidents. >> you can't be a leader of destiny, as i describe it, and change the critical landscape simply because you got elected president and willed to do it. the country has to need that or want that. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the eng
to an actual tie. 5:30 eastern we're going to talk about convention politics with margaret hoover, cnn contributor who served in the bush administration and democratic strategist and cnn contributor maria cardona. before that back to zoraida in new york. >> i know you stayed up late. you listened to all of those speeches live as well. what did you think? what was your takeaway or your favorite moment last night? >> i think dana brought it up, stated it perfectly. mrs. obama. michelle obama, the first lady, delivered a really politically astute piece. it was well written. but her delivery was phenomenal. her growth as a politician or political figure over the years has been extraordinary. everyone left that building last night really buzzing about how she did. >> yeah. definitely charged up. we'll check back in with you. thank you, john. >>> eight minutes past the hour. canadian investigators are trying to figure out why a gunman opened fire during a newly elected premier's victory speech. one person was killed. another is now critically injured. quebec's premier elect was rushed off th
. >> bill: 13 minutes before the top of the hour. margaret covers the white house from bloomberg news. she'll be joining us at the top of the next hour and then bill buyers later on in studio with us. i want to go back to your calls. a lot of you want to talk about this american university professor. the first day of her class she had a class on sex, gender, and culture, she took a sick baby to class with her, and breastfed the baby while standing in front of the class. some students complained they didn't think it was appropriate. and university officials are now caught, are they going to discipline this woman or say this is the way it is. she said she thinks there is nothing wrong with what she did. she said she did it discretely and appropriately. cc is calling from vancouver, washington. good morning. >> caller: good morning, bill. thanks for taking my call. >> bill: okay. right. >> caller: i have never been understand nor has anybody before able to explain to me why breastfeeding is in public is controversial so long as the woman takes reasonable precautions to not
that killed the ambassador to libya and three of his aides. margaret brennan is on capitol hill. margaret? >> reporter: good morning to you, charlie. fbi still hasn't made it to the crime scene in benghazi. secretary clinton will give a classified account of the attacks on the u.s. consulate in libya. witnesses tell cbs news that there was never an anti-american protest outside the consulate. instead they say it came under planned attack. that is in direct contradiction to the administration's account. that comes with complaints that the administration has not been forgetright. >> i'm just stunned and appalled that there wasn't better security for all of the american personnel at that consulate, given the high threat environment. >> now under law, state must establish a panel to investigate the attacks, report to congress within 60 days. today, secretary of state hillary clinton will outline what she is and is not willing to share. what's clear, charlie, is that the public won't get a detailed account of what happened until after the presidential election. >> margaret brennan, thank you.
it is. >> pat: if you read some of the writings that have been put out by margaret sanger -- we talked on this program for many, many years about margaret sanger, the founder o planned parenthood, and what she wanted to do, she wanted to sterilize black people, she wanted to sterilize southern europeans. it was a steril sterilezation campaign. she wanted them to bring people in and sterilize them. she said it very clearly. i urge you all to read it, it's called "breeding the thoroughbred," by margaret sanger. >> i'm sitting here thinking, is that a must read or a must burn. [laughter] >> pat: honey, you read it and then you burn it. >> speaking of burning, we're all trying to burn body fat. up next, not all body fat is created equal. we're going to show you what this grandmother does each day to keep the worst kind of fat away. that's coming up next. [applause and cheers] >> pat: special rosh hashanah show, "the 700 club." a wonderful audience here in the studio, and we're having a good time. when it comes to real estate, you've heard it, it's location, location, location. well, the sa
such as milton freed man. the idea of neoliberalism is there should be massive, selective tax cuts. margaret thatcher it is there is no alternative. of course that's absurd. there was an alternative. we have to connect the dots to understand what is going on today. i read the chronicle. so what i've done is put together a montage of the murder of public sector, which is going on everyday. in fact all of the public sector is in body shape. public libraries, parks from the municipal to the national level. our character is among the worst in the world. the new deal deals with things in a different way. when i was going to school, california school's were the best. now they are among the worst with the new budget cuts. of course, my university is being privatized. all of the higher education is being privatized. all through the uc system. how do you run a modern state with tax cuts? we resort to desperate, back last november, we were asked to vote to make four indian casinos in san diego county pony up money. i thought this was a joke. they voted to do it. now, the governor proposes to borrow a
cannot walk and talk and think, i intend to be doing this. [applause] >> what do you think that margaret sanger would say about the backsliding of women's health taxes and family planning? >> i don't know if you know the beginning of margaret sanger and the beginning of planned parenthood. she opened a clinic in brooklyn and what that clinic did was it taught women the rhythm method. it taught women when they were ovulating and when they were not. when it was said to have intercourse and when it was probable that they would get pregnant. the response was the comstock laws, which was to make any such teaching illegal. and margaret sanger was arrested simply for this. she was not passing out any contraception. she was teaching women about their own menstrual cycle and the ovulation that goes with it. that is all. and that was considered forbidden knowledge when margaret sanger first thought up and started planned parenthood. is it so very different today? i'm not going to say any more on that. >> stemming from your work on meals on wheels, saimany states spend a lot more of their funding o
.n. special representative to syria and a number of other officials. margaret warner is at the united nations. i spoke to her just a short time ago. hello, margaret. so what message was president obama in his speech and secretary clinton in her meetings trying to send? >> warner: judy, i think the way to look at this is a tough love speech from the president and also privately from secretary clinton. and that is to the leaders of these post revolutionary countries that are now trying to make this transition -- and they have to stand up to violence and intolerance in their own societies and extremism -- and president obama said, you know, it's not that we endorse hateful speech. we thought the video was offensive but even when i am criticized with hateful speech, he said, i will fiercely defend the right of people to say it. he also gave them a very practical reason. he said, you know, you're not going to be able to deliver to people what you promise, what they elected you to do, which is jobs and prosperity, unless you get an investment and you won't get it with that kind of violence. >> wood
certificate and married james wily, was widowed and lives nearby with friend and caregiver margaret sales. think it was wrong. it deprived her of having a r own. of he she loves children, she loves my granddaughter. effort to get more victims to come forward than an apology. >> at least the state it can do is provide some kind of compensation. y brother's. >> sara, now 76, still wondered what if. >> would have had a boy and name him max, like my brother. children. >> greta cruise >> geta kreuz. >> there still is a law on the books and delegates are asking lawmakers to compensate those who were sterilized. and talk ch gears weather next. >> but first "the federal hot minute." >> you've heard the old saying, all politics is local? well, what could be more local r pocketbook. you're in the business of ch ernment, take a look whi candidate best serves your interest as you vote in november. phrase ll coined that eminding political candidates voters are most interested in where candidates stand on the everyday issues, issues that impact them directly. can apply to u in the business of governme
colorado is remax ceo margaret kelly. we see their signs all over the united states. margaret, you would be the perfect person where we could check the temperature gauge. but the question that we ask is the most often-asked question, and that is, have we finally bottomed out because it matters to people who are looking to buy, to sell -- to buy, to sell, to refie, or to invest? -- to re-fi or to invest? >> you are exactly right. yes, i really do think we have bottomed out. the good numbers are for 14 months in a row we have had more sales each month for 14 months and the prices have gone up for the last 7 months. those are all great signs for us. in january i was cautiously optimistic. now i'm optimistic. liz: now we are going into the fall season. i never can figure out with you guys. oh the spring is the buying season. the fall is selling season. what is it as we head into fall? >> usually what happens, families like to move in the summer and they like to get their kids in by fall for school, and so usually fall into probably the first of the year, things start to taper off. so if it d
out of afghanistan. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: on a pre-convention swing through virginia yesterday, president obama again touted his plans to end the afghan war. >> this november you get to decide the future of the war in afghanistan. by the end of this month i will have brought home 33,000 troops. ( applause ) i've said we will end this war in 2014. >> warner: but a linchpin of that promise-- to train afghan forces to take over the fight-- faces a new challenge. 45 nato troops have been killed this year by afghan troops-- 15 just last month. all this, just two years before a planned hand-over of security to full afghan control. u.s. and afghan officials have vowed to fix the problem. and in kabul today, a defense ministry spokesman said hundreds of afghan forces have been fired or detained for showing links with insurgents. >> all the afghan security forces were ordered to use all their resources in hand to prevent these kinds of incidents. the afghan defense ministry with the help of international community will follow this matter by exchanging intelligence inf
balloons. no balloon drop at a convention. the bottom of the hour we talk to margaret hoover and richard socarides. >>> former president clinton did not do it in his speech, neither did mitt romney. that's why u.s. service members will be listening to president tonight to see if he mentions the war in afghanistan. we go live to kabul, coming up. [ bridesmaid ] blacked out... but i'm a bridesmaid. oh! "x" marks the spot she'll never sit. but i bought a dress! a toast... ...to the capital one venture card. fly any airline, any flight, anytime. double miles you can actually use. what a coincidence? what's in your wallet? [ all screaming ] watch the elbows ladies. [ all screaming ] you see us, at the start of the day. on the company phone list that's a few names longer. you see us bank on busier highways. on once empty fields. everyday you see all the ways all of us at us bank are helping grow our economy. lending more so companies and communities can expand, grow stronger and get back to work. everyday you see all of us serving you, around the country, around the corner. us bank. i just ser
washington bureau. thanks very much. at the got o the hour we talk to cnn contributor margaret hoover who worked in the bush white house and richard socarides. >>> at 7:00 a.m., soledad o'brien will be talking with bay buchanan to get her talk on all of this. >>> this just in, french prosecutors deciding to open a preliminary criminal investigation into the publication of topless photos of the duchess of cam braj. lawyers for the royal couple are also trying to get the french courts to issue an injunction forbidding further publication or resale of photos of the duchess on bathing topless in the south of france. a decision on that request is respected within the hour. >>> it is six minutes past the hour. a quick check of what else is going on around the world this morning. at least nine people have been killed in a predawn car bombing in kabul, afghanistan. a spokesman for an insurgent group with ties to the taliban is taking responsibility here and says it is in response to an anti-islam film that has angered muslims around the world. that car bomber reportedly rammed a small sedan into
. >>> in the next half hour of "early start" we'll be joined by margaret hoover and richard socarides. they always have so much to say. fun to have them on. >>> now to america's growing impatience with the nfl's replacement refs. you knew it was only a matter of time before the politicians turned it into political fire. paul ryan yesterday as mitt romney's running mate. very unhappy about the replacement reps rob. >> did you guys watch that packer game last night? i mean, give me a break. it is time to get the real refs -- and it reminds me of president obama and the economy. if you can't get it right, it's time to get out. >> paul ryan called the refs out today are. you glad that he did that? >> paul was very angry that the green bay packers won and the referees took it away from him. >> i think a lot of people feel that way, right? the democrats are also paying in on the replay mean your. breaking out an nfl analyst. listen. >> with the football game, no, i did not think it was a touchdown. i thought the pass was down before there was joint progression. and we need to get more serious people in
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 383 (some duplicates have been removed)